peterkling
uxrave:

Super useful free download: Bootstrap, from Twitter for Fireworks. Includes vectors for popular UI components and interactions. More Fireworks wireframing goodies at http://fireworkswireframingkit.com/

uxrave:

Super useful free download: Bootstrap, from Twitter for Fireworks. Includes vectors for popular UI components and interactions. More Fireworks wireframing goodies at http://fireworkswireframingkit.com/

uxrave:

Navigation patterns for responsive web design by @brad_frost
- Top Nav or “Do Nothing” Approach
- The Footer Anchor
- The Select Menu
- The Left Nav Flyout
- The Footer Only
- The “Hide and Cry”

uxrave:

Navigation patterns for responsive web design by @brad_frost

- Top Nav or “Do Nothing” Approach

- The Footer Anchor

- The Select Menu

- The Left Nav Flyout

- The Footer Only

- The “Hide and Cry”

Leider wird die Wichtigkeit davon im Alltag unterschätzt (meist von Leuten die nichts davon wissen), oder der “Kampf” ständig zu Erklären das Design bei weitem mehr ist als nur etwas “hübsch” machen mit Verdruss aufgegeben.

Am Ende verlieren dabei die User…

Nothing new, but the “G+” part made me smile..

Nothing new, but the “G+” part made me smile..

Ruby On Rails 3 - AppConfig.yml

For each and every Rails app, I always needed some kind of app configuration file. Something simple, at best as a YML-file. With some research on google and stackoverflow I ended up with the following solution. It’s neither new nor groundbreaking and probably someone else has already done it that way. 

This solution allows to:

  • Have a “default” configuration
  • For every environment changing some attributes 
  • No need to copy all attributes for every environment 
  • It allows nested attributes for easier access and better readability. (eg. homepage>head)
  • It’s hashed
  • You can access the AppConfig from everywhere in your rails app by using “AppConfig[:homepage][:head]”

(Tested with Rails 3.2.1)

New file at ‘config/app_config.yml’:

defaults:

  homepage:

    head: peterkling

    subline: "webdesign: analyse | konzeption | gestaltung | umsetzung"

development:

  homepage:

    head: "peterkling [DEV]"

test:

production:

New file at ‘lib/appconfig.rb’:

config = ActiveSupport::HashWithIndifferentAccess.new(YAML.load_file("#{Rails.root.to_s}/config/app_config.yml"))

if !config[Rails.env].nil?
  AppConfig = config[:defaults].deep_merge(config[Rails.env])
else
  AppConfig = config[:defaults]
end

Add to environment.rb

load 'lib/appconfig.rb'

Access AppConfig eq. in views:

<h1><%= AppConfig[:homepage][:head]%></h1>

<h2><%= AppConfig[: homepage][:subline]%></h2>

sieht interessant aus :)
uxrave:

Initializr Start an responsive HTML5 project in 15 seconds via @brad_frost

sieht interessant aus :)

uxrave:

Initializr Start an responsive HTML5 project in 15 seconds via @brad_frost

uxrave:

http://css3test.com/ Test which CSS3 features your browser recognizes. Lea Verou explains more in her blog post

uxrave:

http://css3test.com/ Test which CSS3 features your browser recognizes. Lea Verou explains more in her blog post

Being a Web designer & not considering speed/performance is like being a print designer & not considering how your colors will print.
@lukew (via uxrave)
oh wie wahr!
(via xkcd: Wisdom of the Ancients)

oh wie wahr!

(via xkcd: Wisdom of the Ancients)

CSS Sprites leicht gemacht mit dieser Adobe Fireworks Extension von http://www.euchoice.com. Statt umständlichen rumgefummel einfach meinem Knopfdruck:

  • Alle Elemente automatisch anordnen 
  • CSS Code mit x,y,width,height generieren 

Damit kann man Ewigkeiten sparen! :)